<table cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><tr><td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Ecoli4th
E coli
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Cit2div2_5th
Citrobacter diversus
</TD>
<td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Citdiv2_5th
Citrobacter diversus
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle width="50%">Gram Negative Bacilli Achrxyl2_5th
Achromobacter xyloxidans
</TD>
<td align=middle width="50%">Gram Negative Bacilli Achrxyl4th
Achromobacter xyloxidans
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Entcloacae2_5th
Enterobacter cloacae
</TD>
<td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Entcloacae4th
Enterobacter cloacae
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Mormor2_5th
Morganella morganii
</TD>
<td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Mormor4th
Morganella morganii
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Xanmalt2_5th
Xanthomonas maltophilia
</TD>
<td align=middle>Gram Negative Bacilli Xanmalt4th
Xanthomonas maltophilia
</TD></TR></TABLE>
<table cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><tr><td align=middle colSpan=2>Strictly anaerobic gram negative bacilli. They are all part of the normal enteric flora. They are all non-invasive organisms which are only pathogenic opportunistically.</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Bacteroides fragilis </TD>
<td align=middle>Bacteroides </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Fusobacterium </TD>
<td align=middle>Prevotella </TD></TR></TABLE>
<table cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><tr><td align=left colSpan=4>The gram negative facultative bacilli represent by far the most numerous group of clinical bacteria. They can be separated into four groups. Those which are fastidious. Those which ferment glucose. Those which do not ferment glucose. Those which are oxidase positive. These distinctions are useful in the accurate identification of the organisms, although automation of the determinations of the biochemical reaction patterns of the gram negative bacilli have made a rigorous knowledge of specific patterns by a technician somewhat less important than in the past for those locations where such automation exists. Where automation exists an isolated colony can be dispersed in a small amount of solution and placed in a machine which, in most instances, will deliver both the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and the id results within about eight hours. Where automation is lacking, a rack of thirty or forty glass tubes must be inoculated individually as well as a disc sensitivity plate and incubated overnight to identify the organismand determine its antibiotic susceptibility pattern.
Antigen-antibody reactions in the form of agglutination procedures, enzyme linked immunoassays, and fluorescent antibody techniques have been developed for the identification of bacterial organisms. These have contributed to increased specificity and rapidity in organism identification. Today it is possible for example to identify Bordatella pertussis or B parapertussis directly from a nasopharyngeal swab by FA microscopic procedure in as little as fifteen minutes. Bordet-Gengou? What's that?
Often the physician is equally if not more concerned with the antimicrobial susceptibility results than the exact genus and/or species identification for a particular organism. In other cases the physician is interested in genus, specie, and serotype or strain as well.</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>Gram negative bacilli which are fastidious: </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Acinetobacter baumannii</TD>
<td align=middle>Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans </TD>
<td align=middle>Bordetella pertussis </TD>
<td align=middle>Brucella </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Campylobacter </TD>
<td align=middle>Capnocytophaga </TD>
<td align=middle>Cardiobacterium hominis </TD>
<td align=middle>Eikenella corrodens </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Francisella tularensis </TD>
<td align=middle>Haemophilus ducreyi </TD>
<td align=middle>Helicobacter pylori </TD>
<td align=middle>Kingella kingii </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Legionella pneumophila </TD>
<td align=middle>Pasteurella multocida </TD>
<td align=middle></TD>
<td align=middle></TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>Enterobacteriaceae, glucose-fermenting gram-negative bacilli </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Citrobacter </TD>
<td align=middle>Enterobacter </TD>
<td align=middle>Escherichia coli </TD>
<td align=middle>Klebsiella pneumoniae </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Proteus </TD>
<td align=middle>Salmonella enteriditis </TD>
<td align=middle>Salmonella typhi </TD>
<td align=middle>Shigella </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Serratia marcescens </TD>
<td align=middle>Yersinia enterocolitica </TD>
<td align=middle>Yersinia pestis </TD>
<td align=middle></TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>
</TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>Gram negative bacilli, non-glucose fermenters </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Acinetobacter</TD>
<td align=middle>Pseudomonas aeruginosa </TD>
<td align=middle>Flavobacterium meningosepticum </TD>
<td align=middle></TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Xanthomonas maltophilia </TD>
<td align=middle>Burkholderia pseudomallei</TD>
<td align=middle>Burkholderia cepacia</TD>
<td align=middle></TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle colSpan=4>Gram negative bacilli, glucose fermenting, oxidase positive. </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle>Aeromonas </TD>
<td align=middle>Plesiomonas shigelloides </TD>
<td align=middle>Vibrio cholerae </TD>
<td align=middle>Vibrio parahemolyticus </TD></TR>
<tr><td align=middle></TD>
<td align=middle></TD>
<td align=middle>Vibrio vulnificus </TD></TR></TABLE>